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FELLOW’S CORNER in being more involved in the NCS. Of the 95 respondents, 17 motivated residents said they would like to join NCS committees and become involved. The survey results provide several areas of potential improvement to recruit interested residents, including the following: By Saef Izzy, MD • Encourage neurology residents’ attendance at NCS meetings. To achieve this, increased mentorship by neurocritical care faculty and encouraging residents When I was a neurology resident a few years to submit abstracts and attend meetings are potential ago, I was first introduced to the mission, interventions. Additionally, reaching out to residents activities, and website of the NCS by a through advertisements for meetings (electronic or through neurocritical care faculty member and a great program leadership) is another mean of welcoming their mentor, Susanne Muehlschlegel. I started to interaction. attend the NCS meetings and was struck by the fact that, although the other residents I • Currents and the Neurocritical Care journal are other met at the meetings were enthusiastic about avenues for reaching out to residents. The NCS can do this their research and meeting like-minded by utilizing the newly formed RFTF and by asking NCS individuals, they were relatively few. faculty members to provide electronic links for Currents and the Neurocritical Care journal to their residents. Since then, I have always been curious about the experiences neurology residents nationwide have in neurocritical care and • Working with programs to improve residents’ procedural ways that we can reach out to residents and encourage them to skills, potentially through mechanisms such as simulation attend NCS meetings and participate in NCS activities. sessions, ACLS, and ENLS. In addition, directly querying residents at various programs about their exposure to With the help of the NCS Executive Office and the new Resident neurocritical care with an eye towards improving the and Fellow Task Force (RFTF), the Communication Committee learning experience for residents may help with recruitment. designed a survey to capture more information about neurology residents’ knowledge of the NCS and neurocritical care fellowship I hope the results of this survey will help the NCS better in general, as well as their exposure to neurocritical care during understand residents’ needs and work to improve their residency training. neurocritical care experience while getting residents more engaged in NCS activities. We surveyed neurology residents nationwide with a brief 20-question survey, using Survey Monkey, which was distributed I would like to acknowledge all the residents who participated in to the residents by their program directors and our NCS members. this survey. I would also like to extend my special thanks to the RFTF members and JoAnn Taie and Tessa Wegenke from the NCS A total of 95 residents, representing one international and 37 U.S. Executive Office for all their help in reviewing and distributing residency programs, participated in the survey. Three quarters this survey. of respondents had heard of the NCS. Interestingly, only 7% of respondents were members of the NCS and only 6% of residents had attended an NCS meeting. Of participants who had heard of the NCS, 62% of residents had learned of it through their residency program, 52% through their Through my residency program neurocritical care faculty, and 17% through reading papers in the Neurocritical Care journal. (Figure 1) My general neurology residency We also asked respondents if they were familiar with two mentor NCS publications, namely the Neurocritical Care journal and Currents, the quarterly NCS news magazine that provides the My Neurocri6cal care faculty latest updates on NCS activity. Surprisingly, only 13% of residents knew about Currents, while 59% were familiar with the American Academy of Neurology Neurocritical Care journal. My exposure to neurocritical care during residency training Reading ar6cle published in was vital to my career choice, and I was curious about what Neurocri6cal Care journal degree of exposure other programs afforded residents. In this survey, 85% of respondents reported their program incorporates Browsing internet mandatory neurocritical care rotations during the PGY2 and PGY3 years, suggesting that many respondents had more than one neurocritical care rotation. Of note, the survey respondents Figure 1 indicated that the PGY2 and PGY3 years are the optimal time in their training for this experience. During residents’ neurocritical care rotations, they worked with a range of care providers, including neurocritical care trained faculty (96%), fellows (81%), and nurse practitioners or physician assistants (75%). Respondents reported that neurointensivists were on staff at 93% of the 37 institutions represented in this survey. At the remaining institutions, ten respondents reported that patients requiring neurocritical care receive that care from pulmonary and critical care faculty and anesthesiology and critical care faculty. Unfortunately, the level of comfort with procedural skills reported by residents was low, as less than half felt very comfortable or comfortable (12% and 21% respectively), compared to those who felt somewhat uncomfortable or not at all comfortable (22% and 37% respectively) with placing a central line. (Figure 2) In line with my experience, 68% of respondents agreed that their neurocritical care rotation experience influenced their decision to pursue or not pursue a fellowship in neurocritical care. At the end of the survey, we asked participants if they would be interested 14 Figure 2


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