Page 18

ezMag_277323_SmithBucklin_NCS_March_Currents_3

Needs Assessment Completed to Guide NCS Nursing Committee Priorities By Mary Guanci, MSN, RN, CNRN, Mary Amatangelo, MSN, RN, APRN-BC, CCRN, and Karen March, MN, RN, CNRN NCS is one of the few organizations that provides members with the opportunity to share research, education and patient management strategies in a truly collaborative interprofessional environment. The recognition of this benefit may in part be responsible for recent increases in nursing membership. The NCS Nursing Committee is charged with identifying, supporting and promoting the needs of this nursing membership. In 2016, the Nursing Committee conducted a survey of the needs and perspectives of NCS nurses to ensure that we are meeting member needs, to guide the development of educational programming, and to assist the committee in establishing goals for the future. In addition, the survey provided demographic information that may be useful in future marketing strategies to promote membership in NCS by neuroscience nurses caring for critical care patients and their families. The needs assessment was designed by NCS Nursing Committee members Mary Guanci, Mary Amatangelo and Karen March, and edited with assistance from the NCS nursing members. A call to members requested their aid in completion of the survey and highlighted the opportunity to influence the direction of the NCS by setting priorities and developing educational programs for the upcoming year. The survey link was distributed to NCS nursing members in July and August 2016, and the initial results were reviewed by the Nursing Committee at our in-person meeting in September. An overview of the results is provided here; complete results are posted on the NCS Nurse Forum and can also be obtained by emailing Nursing Committee Chair Dea Mahanes, MSN, RN, CCNS (deamahanes@gmail.com). There were 58 respondents, predominantly employed in a dedicated Neuro ICU. The average age of respondents was 40-59 years of age. The majority of respondents had 21-30 years of experience with most being bedside nurses (35 percent) or nurse practitioners (31 percent). NCS nursing membership has increased in recent years, and this was reflected in the survey, with most participants indicating that they have been NCS members between one and two years. Respondents identified the NCS journal, ENLS and multidisciplinary guidelines as the primary benefits of NCS membership. Educational support, ENLS, multidisciplinary guideline development and nursing mentorship/ advocacy were identified as the most important ways that NCS can support its nurse members. Barriers to joining NCS included a lack of awareness of the Society and financial constraints related to membership dues. Most participants (83 percent) plan to continue membership in NCS, although 17 percent are undecided. The Nursing Committee will use the results of the needs assessment to guide the selection of future educational offerings and resource materials, and to explore possible formats that may be used to deliver content. The membership identified advanced anatomy and physiology, decision making through disease-specific case studies, cerebrovascular hemodynamics and diagnostic imaging as top educational priorities. Self-paced modules, on-line learning, and continued participation at the annual meeting were identified as the most popular ways to provide educational information that will enhance patient care. In addition, the Nursing Committee is committed to sharing the information and insights gained from the Nursing Needs Assessment with other NCS committees, with the goal of supporting nurse involvement throughout the organization and further expanding the nursing membership. Mary Guanci, MSN, RN, CNRN Mary Amatangelo, MSN, RN, APRN-BC, CCRN Karen March, MN, RN, CNRN Figure 1: Nurse Members: Primary Place of Employment Figure 2: Nurse Members: How long have you been a member of NCS? 18


ezMag_277323_SmithBucklin_NCS_March_Currents_3
To see the actual publication please follow the link above